Gene linked to obesity-related diabetes


Changes in fat tissue itself - not an overreaction by the immune system - may play the key role in the eventual development of obesity-related diabetes, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati. The findings, published in Tuesday's edition of "Cell Metabolism," are already giving researchers at UC a new target for drug development for type 2 diabetes and certain aggressive cancers. Doctors already knew that obesity-related glucose intolerance and the type 2 diabetes that often follow are triggered by inflammation that occurs with obesity. Many believed the inflammation was caused by certain immune cells, and drug research efforts have focused on targeting those immune cells. But researchers Jorge Moscat and Maria Diaz-Meco found that a gene call PKC-zeta plays a key role in the inflammation process. In normal cells, Moscat said, the gene regulates inflammation to help control glucose balance. Studies in lab animals showed the gene works differently in fat cells, or adipocytes. Instead of maintaining the glucose balance, it causes the fat cells to secrete a chemical called IL-6 that

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Gene linked to obesity-related diabetes